read general conference talk

Looking for a way to “read” General Conference talks that you love?

General Conference is my favorite! I LOVE hearing from our prophet, apostles, and leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I loved the focus on letting God prevail in our lives and faith (that’s seemed to be the threads I heard or needed).

 

I am excited to reread and study each talk more in-depth. I am a paper/pencil kind of girl so I love to study with a physical copy. I also love my Gospel Library App to listen to or watch specific talks over and over.

 

Today I want to share a few resources that I use or have used to “read” the General Conference talks for the next six months. 

{DISCLAIMER:}  Affiliate Links may be used in this post of which I may receive a small commission. The price does not change for you. I only recommend products and tools I use or would use myself.

Liahona Magazine

(formerly the Ensign)—this has been my go-to resource for years. I love having all the talks in one place (with the footnotes), printed and ready for me to read. I love the artwork throughout the talks, the updated General Authorities poster, the biographies of new General Authorities, and the slick paper.

 

I always have pens handy to underline words, phrases and quotes I love. I also love to write notes in the margins. Lately, my favorite pens are the  Sharpie Art Pens (Fine Point in assorted colors-I love using lots of colors ) or gel pens (Paper Mate or Bic

 

I like to use a small ruler (metal or clear) to underline my favorite parts of each talk. I have also used colorful Bic Pens. I have found that colored pencils are not my favorite to use in the Liahona magazine. 

 

After reading each talk, I always write the date at the bottom by the footnotes.

 

I love that the General Conference issue shows up in my mailbox three to four weeks after General Conference in April and October of each year as part of the Liahona magazine subscription. I love that I can pay a little more and request additional copies of the General Conference issues that come out in May and November of each year. It is so easy to take my Conference Issue with me wherever I go. 

 

The major drawback for me with the Liahona magazine is there isn’t enough space to write my notes. The other thing is you have to wait a few weeks to begin studying with the magazine. Lastly, the cover isn’t very robust so your magazine can easily tear or rip, especially when I am using it on a consistent basis.

 

Using the Liahona Magazine fits the following learning styles: Intrapersonal (read and record personal thoughts and applications), Linguistic (reading the words in the General Conference issue),  Logical-Mathematical (all talks are sequential and in order in the magazine with footnotes and space to write the date of when each talk was read), and Spacial-Visual (there is colorful artwork in each magazine as well as small areas to doodle or write notes).

PROS

CONS

  • All talks and footnotes are in one place and ready to read with artwork
  • The General Conference issue is a part of your Liahona Magazine subscription
  • Nice slick paper that works nicely with most pens and markers
  • Very affordable $1-$2 per issue
  • Can spiral bind the magazine with clear plastic covers for durability
  • Arrives in the mail about 4 weeks after General Conference
  • Not a lot of extra space to write additional notes in the margins
  • Cover can fall off or tear easily–especially when used a lot (extra cost for spiral binding)
  • Pencils and colored pencils do not write as well on the slick paper

Favorite Supplies:

Gospel Library App General Conference

Gospel Library App

I love using the Gospel Library app to watch or listen to specific General Conference talks. I also love to read sometimes on the Gospel Library App, especially when I am doing a more in-depth study using the footnotes. I love that I can click on the footnote and the scripture reference and passage pop up in the side bar and I don’t have to go searching the scriptures to read the passage. 

 

I like that I can underline, highlight, write notes, tag and link to other scripture verses or items in the Gospel Library App. I also really like the “define” feature which will pull up word definitions. 

 

The other feature I just love is the date stamp— you can add a date stamp and time to the notes you take in the app. I love to go back and look at the thoughts I recorded about a specific verse and know exactly which day I took the note. Sometimes I may make a note on the same verse and I add an additional date stamp. This way I can see my understanding or application of a specific verse over time.

 

I love that I can listen to General Conference talks while driving, exercising or doing yard ward by pairing my phone with my headphones, portable speaker, or car stereo system. So many options! 

 

I love that my phone is usually always with me so I can read or listen to a conference talk wherever I am. 

 

The only downside I can even think of is I wish you could somehow print the notes that you add to the Gospel Library App (if anyone knows a way to do this without copying and pasting everything—please let me know!).

 

Using the Gospel Library App fits the following learning styles: Intrapersonal (read and record personal thoughts, impressions, and application), Kinesthetic (Listen to General Conference talks while exercising, cleaning, etc.), Linguistic (read or listen to General Conference talks),  Logical-Mathematical (use the date stamp feature to organize the things you are learning on specific days), Musical (Listen to the words and musical numbers during General Conference), Naturalist (Listen to General Conference while gardening or read talks outside), and  Spacial-Visual (watch each talk or whole sessions of General Conference).

PROS

CONS

  • All talks and footnotes are in one place and ready to read
  • Talks are available on the app 1-2 days after conference
  • Digital marking and linking tools available on the app
  • Free and everything is at your fingertips–in the palm of your hand
  • Cannot quickly print personal notes added on the app
  • Cannot add artwork or visuals
  • Can easily be distracted by other apps, texts or calls while studying
  • Additional screen time needed daily for gospel study on top of screen time for work or school, etc.

General Conference Address- Journal Edition

General Conference Addresses, Journal Edition (I have not used this option) is another study option for General Conference talks. The text is in one column with about 2 to 2.5 inches of faint lines for journaling on the side. The footnotes are included and the spiral-bound book is available for purchase from Deseret Book about one month after General Conference is over (preorders going on now). This is perfect for those who those who love lines to write on and want it ready to go.

 

Using the General Conference Journal Edition fits the following learning styles: Intrapersonal (Room to write personal notes, questions and reflections), Linguistic (read the words and study footnotes in the General Conference talks),  Logical-Mathematical (wide margins allow you to write lists and sequence events), and Visual Spacial (Wide margins to allow for doodling with most pens, markers and colored pencils).

PROS

CONS

  • All talks and footnotes are in one place and ready to read
  • The General Conference Journal Edition is spiral bound
  • About 2″ faint lined margins for journaling on each page
  • Available at most LDS Bookstores for about $8 (like Deseret Book and Seagull Book)
  • Available about one month after General Conference
  • Journaling area is lined (especially if you wanted to draw artwork in the margins)
  • You cannot add easily add additional pages to the book
  • May have additional shipping costs

Favorite Supplies:

Courtney Casper Wide PDF

Courtney Casper (courtneycasper.com/ and @courtneycasper.letters) has a free wide margin conference talk pdf she offers with the text written in a one-column format including the footnotes for each talk. 

 

Each talk starts at the top of a page so you can easily print individual talks. She leaves about 3 inches of white space on one side of each page to journal, doodle, or add pictures or quotes. The font size is about 12 pt. in this download. 

 

When I use this format, I print the whole double sided and hole punch them and put them in a three-ring binder so I can additional pages if I want. You could also have it spiral bound. I love to use my Sharpie Fine Point Markerscolored pencilsrulergel pens or Bic pens to mark up my conference talks.

 

Using the Courtney Casper- Wide Margin PDF fits the following learning styles: Intrapersonal (plenty of space to record personal thoughts and application), Linguistic (all talks and footnotes from General Conference are included),  Logical-Mathematical (all talks are in order with place to write the date each talk was read), and Visual Spacial (can easily add color, graphics, and quotes to the wide margins).

PROS

CONS

  • FREE PDF of all talks and footnotes are in one place and ready to read 
  • 3″ wide margin on each page, unlined
  • Can three-hole punch pages and put in a binder and add additional pages
  • Text is in one column with a point size of about 12
  • You need to print yourself
  • More pages since the font size is larger and talks begin on their own page
  • Additional cost for spiral binding or a three-ring binder to store the pages
  • Margins are unlined–No lines to write neat notes

Favorite Supplies:

Work and Wonder Wide

Rio Grange (workandwonderco.com/ and @work.and.wonder) also has a free wide margin PDF download of all the General Conference talks with the text in two columns including the footnotes for each talk. 

 

There is about 2.5 inches of blank space to doodle or journal. In this download, each new talk starts right after the previous one has finished on the page (meaning talks do not always start at the top of the page so the amount of pages needed to print all the talks is fewer). The font in this download is a lot smaller –maybe 9 or 10 point

 

When I use this format, I print the whole double sided and hole punch them and put them in a three ring binder. You could also have it spiral bound. I love to use my Sharpie Fine Point Markerscolored pencilsrulergel pens or Bic pens to mark up my conference talks.

 

Using the Work and Wonder- Wide Margin PDF fits the following learning styles: Intrapersonal (lots of space to record personal thoughts and application), Linguistic (all talks and footnotes from General Conference included),  Logical-Mathematical (all talks in order and can easily use a color-coding system for common themes), and Visual Spacial (add color, graphics, and quotes to the wide margins)

PROS

CONS

  • Free PDF of all talks and footnotes in one place to read
  • 2.5″ wide margin on each page, unlined 
  • Can three-hole punch pages and put in a binder and add additional pages
  • Text is in two columns
  • You need to print yourself
  • Font size is about 10 point
  • purchase spiral binding or a three-ring binder
  • Talks do not always start at the top of a page if you wanted to just print out one talk at a time

Favorite Supplies:

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on google
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Learning Styles

Most Popular:

9 Ways to "Give Place"

What are Learning Styles?

Identify your learning styles and find joy in your scripture study

Thank you for joining my email list! I can’t wait to spoil you and promise to keep your email address private

This site uses cookies – small text files that allow personalization of your experience on our site. Learn more HERE. By accessing this site you agree to the use of cookies.